Writing Log 12/02/2018

– I finished editing the third chapter of my book manuscript. Finally! Now that the semester is almost over, hopefully I can pick up the slack and do the last two chapters before the end of the year.

– One of my academic essays, “The Legends of Zelda: Fan Challenges to Dominant Video Game Narratives,” was just published in the collection Woke Gaming: Digital Challenges to Oppression and Social Injustice. The marvelous Kishonna Gray (@kishonnagray on Twitter) was my editor, and it was an incredible experience to work with her!

– I posed a review of Durian Sukegawa’s novel Sweet Bean Paste on Contemporary Japanese Literature. I’m going to admit that the book was far too sentimental for my taste, but I’m still interested in sensitive depictions of illness and disability that don’t follow the usual “and then everyone got better” or “and then everyone died” story routes.

– I posted my postgame fanfic about Riju and Princess Zelda, The Seven Heroines, on AO3. This fic is based on an illustration I commissioned from a lovely artist who goes by @ositia on Tumblr. Essentially, I was so inspired by the artist’s work that I decided to write a story to go with it.

– I drew a silly picture of Ganondorf cosplaying as Eggman for a dear friend who has good taste in video game villains.

– I recycled a pose I didn’t use for Ganondorf and drew Groose from Skyward Sword.

– One of the artists I commissioned to draw Balthazar from The Demon King, Jenn So (@hellojennso on Twitter), just posted her illustration of the character, and her art is amazing! It was a genuine pleasure to be able to work with her, and I’m so grateful for the opportunity to communicate with such a talented artist.

– I commissioned an artist who goes by @Poopikat on Instagram to create an illustration of Hero from The Demon King, and I’m so blown away by her painting of my darling murder child. It’s so cool when an artist is able to intuit what you’re looking for and then adds creative touches from their own vision. Now all I have to do is write the actual novel, right?

Censorship in Fandom

There’s been a lot of talk this past week about Tumblr being removed from the Apple App Store. It turns out that the cause was the site’s failure to filter and remove child pornography, which makes sense.

The prevalence of explicit and often disturbing pornography has been a problem with Tumblr for some time. Tumblr maintains a generally permissive attitude regarding adult content, but the nature of the platform facilitates of the unwelcome spread of this content, as well as unwelcome solicitations. As I tweeted just last week, “Every morning I wake up early, brew a pot of tea, do some stretches, water my houseplants, and then report and block all the pornbots that started following me on Tumblr during the night.”

If this has been a problem with Tumblr for years, why have the people who own and manage the site only started to take action now? The recent and specific concern with child pornography – while absolutely valid! – runs distressingly parallel to the accusations of anti-fandom communities that have dedicated themselves to circulating inflammatory “discourse” regarding fictional characters and romantic pairings between these characters. As I discussed at length in an earlier post, “child abuse” is one of the more common labels applied to something that fandom antis don’t approve of. To be clear, anti-fandom communities are not protesting the treatment of actual minors, but the depiction of characters from animated entertainment media such as the Netflix show Voltron: Legendary Defender or the anime My Hero Academia. Within this context, a high school age character in a relationship with a college age character is construed as “pedophilia” regardless of how the characters and their relationships are presented. The motives behind such accusations are complicated and diverse, but they often boil down to a strong preference for another romantic pairing.

For fandom antis, romantically shipping the “wrong” two characters occupies the same category as actual child pornography, and communities of antis are frequently mobilized by a strong and charismatic leader to report someone in a character or pairing fandom that they don’t like for “child abuse” or “child pornography.” The way I’ve seen this work is that a popular anti-fandom blog will reblog a “problematic” post and add tags attacking the original poster, which prompts the anti-fandom blog’s followers to send in abuse reports and directly harass the original poster. (As an example of how absurd this can be in practice, I was recently harassed about “animal abuse” after posting an anime-style drawing of a man holding a cartoon pig.) If the reblogged post contains links to other social media sites, the harassers will often follow the original poster and try to report them for “abuse” on that site as well.

Although I’m sure the situation is complicated, I strongly suspect that the Tumblr app itself was reported to the Apple App Store for containing “child pornography” by these highly mobilized communities of fandom antis. As a result, Tumblr does seem to have made a greater effort to clean itself up, which is fantastic (and, quite frankly, should have happened years ago). Unfortunately, there have also been substantiated reports circulated within fandom communities about the blogs of popular fan artists and writers being deleted by Tumblr, along with at least two prominent blogs of people who write critical essays about fandom as a subculture. I don’t think this is a coincidence, and I also don’t think it’s a coincidence that Tumblr has just added “contains depictions of fictional minors” to its form for reporting violations of the site guidelines.

Fandom antis tend to be authoritarian in their worldview and behavior, as demonstrated by their insistence on ideological purity and their clearly stated justifications for using any means necessary to ferret out and then attack perceived dissidents. People who have embraced this authoritarian mindset often call for censorship and villainize platforms that do not practice censorship, an example of which is illustrated by the screencap of the widely circulated Tumblr post at the beginning of this essay. I’m wary of censorship in any situation, but I think it’s an especially dangerous policy within the context of fandom.

Although fandom can and has influenced mainstream culture, fandom communities exist at the edges and within the gaps of mainstream culture. Free speech – especially free speech at the margins of any given society – is absolutely necessary for liberty and equality, especially for people who occupy minority positions. Words like “liberty” and “equality” are frustratingly abstract, so let me offer a concrete example of the effects of censorship with a brief bit of background.

Throughout the 1970s, female intellectuals in the United States staged a vigorous critique against sexist and violent imagery in their media and culture, and in 1979 a New York based organization called Women Against Pornography started to gain traction. Partially because of the outreach efforts of this organization, in 1983 two law professors named Andrea Dworkin and Catharine MacKinnon drafted an antipornography law that ended up being passed by the Minneapolis City Council. The twin problems with this law were that it was both hopelessly vague regarding the nature of “pornography” and extremely specific regarding its focus on denying the depiction of women’s pleasure. Dworkin and MacKinnon wrote extensively and published prolifically, and in the next few years versions of their law were enacted elsewhere, including Los Angeles County and the state of Massachusetts. Although Dworkin and MacKinnon identified as feminists, local and national feminist groups wanted nothing to do with them, and their support came from conservative Christian interest groups, the same people who were also campaigning to take sex education out of American schools.

In the United States, the Supreme Court eventually struck these laws down as being unconstitutional as a result of court cases filed largely by lesbian and gay rights organizations. Canada was even more conservative than America during the 1980s, however, and the Meese Pornography Commission that informed and influenced the Canadian Supreme Court’s deliberations on antipornography laws was utterly dominated by right-wing opponents of women’s rights. According to the court’s eventual decision in 1992, such laws were upheld, and the first “pornographers” targeted by police were feminist and lesbian bookstores (remember that, since these laws only targeted depictions of women’s pleasure, gay men were largely off the hook). Ironically, because Andrea Dworkin’s 1989 book Pornography contained samples of the sort of imagery she argued should be banned by law, the actual passage of such laws resulted her own book being banned in Canada.

Let’s return to the ostensible issue at hand – child abuse and “protecting the children.”

A good case study of how censorship denies resources to children on the margins, such as children with queer genders and sexualities and children who experience abuse, is the reception of Bryan Talbot’s 1995 graphic novel The Tale of One Bad Rat, which chronicles a young woman’s flight from home after being abused by a male relative, her struggles living as a homeless minor, and the uneasy peace she is finally able to make with her trauma. According to Talbot, he could have written the story of a homeless girl finding a home without the depiction of abuse, but, as he says himself, “the issue was far too important to marginalize.”

Due to the inclusion of this depiction, however, The Tale of One Bad Rat has been successfully removed from schools, libraries, and bookstores in Canada, with challengers citing local and national antipornography laws. The graphic novel is nothing that any sane person would consider “pornography,” and it was expressly intended to serve as a source of strength and comfort. Because it was challenged so relentlessly, however, multiple writers and artists from across the Commonwealth (including, most famously, Neil Gaiman) were continually called on to help defend it in the ten years after its release. The situation concerning banned and blacklisted books in Canada has recently gotten better, but throughout the 1990s and 2000s multiple people were charged, fined, and literally imprisoned on account of the comics they owned, imported, or ordered for their libraries.

Fiction and art can be extremely powerful tools with far-ranging effects, but censorship never hurts people who are already in a position of power. The victims of censorship have historically been the young, the queer, the poor, racial and ethnic minorities, and other people on the margins. Demanding that AO3 remove works with “problematic” content is a slippery slope, and I promise that fandom, as a collective community, does not want to go down that road.

This is precisely why it’s so upsetting to see fandom antis attacking communities of left-leaning young queer people, who are more likely to be survivors of assault or suffering from mental health-related illnesses. Antis are punching down, and they direct the blunt of their attacks toward those who are most vulnerable, not entrenched systems of inequality or, in this particular scenario, the social, political, and digital structures facilitating child abuse. If people posting actual child pornography are kicked off of Tumblr (as we can all agree they should be), they will undoubtedly post that material elsewhere. For people trying to understand the abuse they have experienced themselves, however, there may not be anywhere else to go.

The recent purge on Tumblr might seem like a victory in the fight to create safer online spaces, but the authoritarian impulse toward censorship that I suspect triggered this event deserves investigation and a careful application of critical thinking.

The Stan Bryant Saga

I want to share a story about my mother’s family, who all live in rural Georgia. This story is about how strange that part of the world is, and it involves one of my mother’s cousins, Stan Bryant.

Everything I’ve been told is somewhat corroborated by public court records and articles drawn from the local paper, but it’s mostly hearsay. The only thing I can say with 100% certainty is that Stan Bryant is dead.

Stan Bryant was the son of my maternal grandfather’s sister, whom I knew as my Aunt Mervyn. When I was a kid, my Aunt Mervyn scared the bejesus out of me, and I later learned that she had schizophrenia. The disease apparently runs in my mom’s family. My grandfather’s mother, one of my mom’s sisters, and another of my mom’s cousins had it as well. I used to be worried that I would develop symptoms myself, but I think I turned out okay. In any case, Stan was my Aunt Mervyn’s only son, which can’t have been easy.

Stan grew up to be a nurse, and he lived in various cities up and down the East Coast. I met him a few times as an adult, and he seemed like a perfectly normal person, if somewhat mild-mannered and overly polite. Apparently, however, he was a serial wife beater. According to one of my uncles, Stan would be a perfect gentleman until a woman married him, at which point he would commence physically and emotionally assaulting her. This abuse would escalate until Stan felt compelled to flee whatever city he was living in so as to escape legal action. In this manner he married and divorced four wives, leaving behind four sons, all named Stan Bryant.

I should probably mention here that “Stan Bryant” is a pseudonym I created. This business gets weird, and I don’t want anything to be searchable.

Okay, so. After his most recent divorce, Stan Bryant returned to my hometown. Although he ostensibly came back to help care for his mother, Stan didn’t move back in with her. I believe Aunt Mervyn was supported with funds supplied by a trust set up by my grandfather, who had owned land all across the county. He built houses on some of this land; and, after he died, he left various properties to members of the family. Stan was living in one of these houses, which he legally owned. I’m not sure if he was working, but we later found out that he certainly wasn’t paying taxes.

Regardless, Stan started dating a woman named Tammy (also a pseudonym) who had no legal residence of her own and promptly moved in with him. It turns out that Stan had finally met his match, as Tammy was more than a little unstable herself. The two didn’t wait to get married before launching into a series of increasingly violent altercations, the last of which ended in Stan getting shot in the face.

The official account is that Stan threatened Tammy with a gun and then, filled with self-loathing, committed suicide by shooting himself. It’s important to note, however, that Stan never owned a gun, and the gun was registered in Tammy’s name. Tammy also happened to be cheating on Stan with the county sheriff, who was the first person to appear on the scene after the incident.

Because my Aunt Mervyn was not of sound mind, the management of Stan’s estate was overseen by my mother and her two brothers, all three of whom are lawyers. They jointly handled the legal proceedings and unilaterally claimed that the formal investigation of Stan’s death was off-the-charts bizarre. Because none of them felt the need to antagonize the sheriff, however, they let the matter slide. Who knows what actually happened?

Tammy sued the estate for Stan’s house; but, as soon as it came to light that Stan owed tens of thousands of dollars of back taxes, she decided that she wasn’t so interested after all. Instead of declaring bankruptcy on the estate and washing their hands of the affair, my mother and uncles decided that they would rent out Stan’s house. The person they hired to clean the place apparently found things that deeply upset him, and he started spreading stories that the house was haunted. In the end, the only person who would rent it was a Vietnam War veteran living on disability checks.

It initially seemed that this man was a perfect tenant. He paid his rent on time, kept to himself, and didn’t cause trouble. Unfortunately, his neighbor’s wife, whom my mother charmingly refers to as “the town bicycle,” had a crush on him, and he presumably ended up sleeping with her. Her husband, in a fit of jealous rage, reported to the sheriff that the man was using his military connections to run a drug cartel. The veracity of this accusation is debatable (and highly dubious), but the sheriff decided to investigate anyway. What he found in the woods behind the house were two growhouses in which the tenant had been cultivating marijuana. The sheriff confiscated the plants and put the man in jail. Since then, the house has been empty. I’m still not sure who’s doing what about the taxes on the property; but, as long as my mother doesn’t get shot in the face herself, I’ll probably never find out.

Meanwhile, the incident allowed Tammy to receive disability compensation, which she used to buy a house of her own. She also managed to acquire a large commercial property that’s been unoccupied for more than a decade, and she was recently granted a license to convert it into an animal shelter. The officer who heads the local Animal Control was extremely upset about this, as she had prohibited Tammy from setting foot onto the grounds of all the animal shelters in the county years ago because Tammy had been adopting cats and selling them on eBay. As a compromise, the Magistrate’s Office restricted Tammy’s shelter license to a maximum residential capacity of twenty-five cats. This restriction has been relaxed, and the shelter now houses more than fifty cats, which are apparently free to roam the building and grounds.

So the end result of Stan Bryant’s strange life and stranger death is a live-action Neko Atsume. If this story were fiction, I suppose it would have a more fitting conclusion, but I couldn’t make up this sort of thing if I tried.

The world is a weird place, y’all.

How Notes Work on Tumblr

I’ve spent the past four years observing how Tumblr functions, especially how content is spread on the site, and I’ve developed a theory regarding how some posts manage to pick up more notes. This theory reflects my own experiences as someone who regularly posts original content and has slowly gained several thousand followers. I’m sure that other people have had different experiences. Tumblr is huge, after all.

Every blog on Tumblr has a “reblog coefficient,” which indicates how many notes someone’s reblog of a post will generate. If a blog has a reblog coefficient of ten, this means that at least ten of its followers will like and/or reblog any given post one of its posts.

I call the blogs with the highest reblog coefficients “anchor blogs,” as they serve as anchors for a fandom. Even when Tumblr-specific browser extensions (like XKit) are used, it can be difficult to catch everything that comes along in the rapid flow of the Tumblr feed stream, so people attached to a certain fandom will often visit one or two anchor blogs to check for new content, which they will like or reblog directly from that blog.

Tumblr has a category of older communities that we can think of as “legacy fandoms,” by which I mean fandoms that have inherited a large number of fans from fic-centric fandom communities on LiveJournal. To give a concrete example, Hannibal is a legacy fandom of Sherlock, which is itself a transitional legacy fandom of Harry Potter. In the larger legacy fandoms, it’s common for fanfic authors to have anchor blogs. Because the essentially visual nature of Tumblr as a platform can undermine the circulation of text posts even within legacy fandoms, however, sometimes fanfic writers will work together to create and co-moderate anchor blogs that are separate from their main blogs.

In many newer fandoms on Tumblr, however, the anchor blogs tend to be the blogs of popular artists. An artist’s work will generate its own fandom, which will help propel the broader fandom forward. Perhaps because they themselves are visually oriented, the artists who run anchor blogs tend to only reblog art and other image posts. In addition, there are typically several large anchor blogs within any given fandom that will reblog almost anything posted onto a certain tag or set of tags, with the caveat that they also tend to favor image posts.

What this means is that, within Tumblr-based fandom cultures, it’s rare for a text post to get more than thirty to forty notes, even if the author’s blog is fairly popular. There are exceptions, of course, but they’re generally tied to a friendship or collaboration between a writer and an artist. (Two other common exceptions are “discourse,” or aggressively inflammatory statements, and “shitposts,” which are characterized by a distinctive flavor of absurdist humor.) If an artist or other anchor blog reblogs a text post, it can get hundreds and sometimes even thousands of notes.

It’s entirely possible for someone who isn’t an artist to have what I call a “bedrock blog,” which is a blog that one or more of the anchor blogs follow and reblog from. Even if a bedrock blog only has a base reblog coefficient of ten, their practical reblog coefficient can be exponentially larger because of their association with an anchor blog. I’ve noticed a number of commonalities between bedrock blogs in my own fandoms, but one factor that stands out to me is that the people who run them tend to be extroverted and extremely active on the site.

I’ve also developed a theory that the algorithms that regulate Tumblr privilege content that has been liked or reblogged and thus vetted by certain “magnet blogs.” A “magnet blog” is one of the blogs that appears in the “recommended” section of a user’s internal dashboard if they search, track, or start using a certain tag, as the magnet blog is identified by the Tumblr algorithm as being identified with that tag. What this means is that, if you tag a post with a certain tag, and then one of the magnet blogs reblogs your post with the same tag, it’s much more likely to appear in the recommended posts (on both the website and the mobile app) of anyone who has ever liked or reblogged anything with that tag, even if the end user has never actually used the tag on their own blog before.

Based on my observations, a like or reblog from a magnet blog seems to be the difference between an image post getting 200 notes and getting 2,000 notes. This is social networking via algorithm, which means that you can never know who the “right” person to like or reblog your post is at any given time or in any given situation. If I had to guess, I might submit the hypothesis that megapopular (with 20k+ followers) anchor blogs often function as magnet blogs for the tags they use.

There are also more concrete and mechanical factors that influence the distribution of content. For example, Sunday evening from 6:00pm to 8:30pm EST/EDT is the best time to post something on Tumblr. Wednesdays and Thursdays also get a high volume of traffic, with the window between 7:00pm to 10:00pm being particularly active. The trick seems to be to try to catch the sweet spot when both the East Coast and the West Coast will see your work, and hopefully the reblogs will keep the post spreading until the people in Asia and Europe are active. Also, unlike Instagram and other social media sites, only the first five tags of any given post “count,” meaning that the post will only appear on the searches and feeds for those first five tags. There are a few other best practices concerning things such as embedded links and image formatting, but these can change according to a user’s blog theme and the site’s current policies.

When it comes to how many notes any given post on Tumblr will get, specific social connections, timing, and formatting – not to mention creativity, skill, and consistency – are important, as is having a strong social network both on and off Tumblr. That being said, there are other major contributing factors that are not random, exactly, but extremely difficult to control or predict.

Writing Log 11/19/2018

– I finished editing all the stories in my Ghost Stories zine! I reformatted the file in InDesign and sent the PDF to the printer, a service called Mixam that came highly recommended by an artist friend on Tumblr. If all goes well, I should have the books in my hands this Friday.

– I also finished editing the zine for my “Anime and Manga Studies” course this semester. One of the class assignments was for everyone to submit a zine page based on their research projects. Some of the students phoned it in (which kind of hurt my feelings, to be honest), but most of them created fantastic work. It took me a solid eleven hours to put the zine together, but it was worth the effort. I just submitted the file to Mixam this morning, and I should be able to give my students copies of the zine during the final week of class, when they’re scheduled to present their projects.

– I had a wonderful time participating in the “Remembering Isao Takahata, Co-Founder of Studio Ghibli” panel at Anime NYC this past weekend. The panel was sponsored by the Japan Foundation, who put a considerable amount of care into promoting it. As a result, the room was at its full capacity of 215 people. It was a great audience! My co-panelist, CJ Suzuki, is one of my favorite people, and it’s always a pleasure to work with him.

– As I was talking to people over the weekend, I played down the time and effort I put into researching and writing (and memorizing) this presentation, but I’ve actually been working on it since August. I’m considering editing all of my material into a blog post, but that may only happen next year.

– I also introduced a screening of the Takahata film My Neighbors the Yamadas at the Japan Society on Saturday evening. I can’t even begin to describe how incredible this was. I met and talked with so many smart and interesting people, and the experience renewed my sense of what exactly it is that I’m trying to accomplish by studying popular media. It’s not an exaggeration to say that the experience filled me with hope and determination!

Writing Log 11/11/2018

– I finished editing the second chapter of my book manuscript! I was only able to do this because I skipped a department meeting on Wednesday. I’m not proud of this, but work on this project has got to get done.

– I edited four more stories for my Ghost Stories chapbook and touched up the design for the back cover. Everything is looking great! I’m really excited about sharing this when it’s ready.

– I wrote 2,500 words of The Demon King. Although I’ve already written the first chapter, I’m not starting at the beginning, but rather with scenes that I can already see clearly in my mind. Now that I’ve begun to get a better sense of the characters, and I think it’s time to create a chapter outline.

– I’m still working on a Breath of the Wild postgame fanfic called “The Seven Heroines.” I’m done with the first (very rough) draft, and I think the story is probably going to be finished next week at about 2,000 words.

– I wrote half a dozen recommendation letters. Two of these were basically form letters, but I put a considerable amount of effort into the rest.

– I’ve been working to prepare for a panel on Isao Takahata at Anime NYC. I’m also introducing a screening of one of the director’s films, My Neighbors the Yamadas, at the Japan Society. This got a press release on Anime News Network, which is kind of cool. I’m not going to lie – this trip to New York is a big deal for me, and I’m nervous.

Online Horror Fiction

In the presentation I gave about Japanese urban legends for Anime USA, I mentioned a few cursed websites that are relatively well-known in Japan. These websites are mostly digital memorials for deceased relatives (and pets) that overshoot “elegiac” and land squarely in the realm of “disturbing.” I’m sure that a scholar of Asian religions could write an interesting paper about these websites; but, for the purposes of my presentation, the most important thing was to maintain a sense of respect for the family members who created them. While I was putting together my PowerPoint slideshow, I started wondering if there are any cursed websites in American internet lore that might serve as a basis of comparison. Indeed there are, but the actual “cursed websites” I ended up visiting were somewhat underwhelming. What I did find, however, was some fantastic online horror fiction.

For the uninitiated, urban legends that spread online are called “creepypasta” after the “copypasta” text that used to be cut and pasted from a website onto a forum and then into an email and then into another email (and so on) back in the days of AOL and GeoCities. Like urban legends, creepypasta is generally presented as true. Most stories are ostensibly something that happened to the people who originally wrote them, who are presumably “a friend of a friend” of the people who then copy and paste and thereby spread the story. There’s an entire Creepypasta Wiki devoted to these types of stories, but they can also be found elsewhere, including the NoSleep subreddit and Jezebel’s annual scary story contest (here’s one of my favorites, from 2014).

There are all sorts of “Best of Creepypasta” lists out there, but what I’ve collected here are stories I found during my research that were very clearly written as fiction and presented online in interesting ways, as well as a few journalistic attempts to debunk creepypasta that ended up becoming stories in and of themselves.

Annie Is Typing
http://www.storiesforyourscreen.com/annie96-is-typing/

This is a short and very creepy story written in the form of a text message conversation between a young man and his friend, who’s not entirely sure that she’s alone in her house. It’s a lot of fun to watch the story play out seemingly in real time, and the twist at the end is fantastic.

The Dionaea House
http://www.dionaea-house.com/

This is epistolary fiction written in the form of a set of emails that the recipient has posted online for the family of the sender, who has gone missing after he quit his job to investigate a random murder instigated by someone he was friends with as a teenager. He confesses that he always knew something was wrong with this friend, especially after the boy spent a few days in a strange house that his realtor parents could never keep occupied. Between the presentation of the digital found objects and the encroaching insanity of the narrator, this story is like House of Leaves, but with all of the mystery and none of the pretension.

Candle Cove
http://ichorfalls.chainsawsuit.com/

This story takes the form of a short series of posts on a Reddit-style forum about “Candle Cove,” a homebrewed children’s show broadcast on a small public access channel. The people posting share their memories of the show, which, in retrospect, was quite sinister. The twist ending is horrifying and delightful.

Mr. Bear’s Cellar
https://www.bustle.com/articles/72619-is-the-creepypasta-1999-real-heres-the-truth-about-caledon-local-21-and-mr-bears-cellar

This article, written by Lucia Peters, explains the cultural context of 1999, a famous story on the Creepypasta Wiki. This story’s premise is similar to that of “Candle Cove.” The narrator vaguely remembers that a small local public access station, Caledon Local 21, once broadcast a low-budget show called “Mr. Bear’s Cellar,” which is just as upsetting as you’d think it would be. Peters provides an excellent summary of the rambling creepypasta and argues that, although this particular story isn’t true, it’s not unreasonable to think that a similar story very well could be.

Abandoned by Disney
https://www.bustle.com/articles/88129-is-the-creepypasta-abandoned-by-disney-real-heres-the-truth-about-mowglis-palace

This is another article written by Lucia Peters (who – can I just say – is a very cool person). In this article Peters investigates the origin of another famous story on the Creepypasta Wiki, “Abandoned by Disney,” which is about a Disney resort on the coast of North Carolina that was suddenly shut down with no official explanation before it opened to the public. These haunted ruins are not real, but that doesn’t mean that Disney hasn’t actually built and then abandoned waterside resorts. What’s interesting about this article is where and how Peters manages to track down information about these derelict theme parks online. It’s also interesting that the original story has apparently been deleted, perhaps because the author was afraid of the real monster in the room, the Disney Corporation.

Sad Satan
https://kotaku.com/a-horror-game-hidden-in-the-darkest-corners-of-the-inte-1714980337

In this in-depth article, Kotaku reporter Patricia Hernandez tries to figure out whether or not a game called “Sad Satan,” which was featured on a popular Let’s Play channel on YouTube, is actually real. She and I both think that it’s mostly likely not, but her investigation takes her to some interesting places online. What I appreciate about this article is its no-nonsense explanation of what the Deep Web actually is based on details drawn from interviews with people who spend time there. I was also amused by its references to real horror games hidden in places you’d never expect, like Microsoft Excel 95.

The Princess
http://ifyouseeherturnoffthegame.blogspot.com/

This is classic creepypasta from 2011 written in the form of thirteen blog posts. On one level, it’s about the strangeness of video game glitches. On another level, it’s about how odd game-related forums used to be, with faceless and anonymous people spreading rumors, making things up, and roleplaying in ways that didn’t always make a great deal of sense. The fact that this story is posted on Blogspot, which now feels akin to a collection of lost and forgotten ruins on the internet, only heightens the eeriness, but the story is really more nostalgic than scary.

SPC-231
http://www.scp-wiki.net/scp-231

This is probably my favorite story in the shared universe of the SPC Foundation, a wiki hosting the X-Files style “records” of a paragovernmental organization given the task to “secure, contain, and protect” various dangerous and unexplainable phenomena. I learned about this subset of creepypasta through a video of someone playing SPC-87-B, a game based on the entry for SPC-87. What’s so horrifying about this story, as well as many other stories on the SPC wiki, is not the various creatures being documented, but rather the inhumanity of the bureaucratic organization that documents them. SPC-231 is especially disturbing in this regard, specifically in terms of its refusal to specify what something called “Procedure 110-Montauk” actually entails. A short story based on SPC-231, Fear Alone, offers a brilliant interpretation that makes the nastiness of the experience of reading the original case file worthwhile.