“Do the Right Thing”

Black Voters Didn’t Vote for Biden in South Carolina Because They ‘Lack Information’
https://www.thenation.com/article/politics/biden-black-vote/

The argument would be offensive if it weren’t also so dumb. Older black voters in South Carolina have a lifetime of education and experience dealing with the most persistent threat to their safety and rights in this country: white people.

My read of the South Carolina vote is that black people know exactly what they’re doing, and why. Joe Biden is the indictment older black folks have issued against white America. His support is buttressed by chunks of the black community who have determined that most white people are selfish and cannot be trusted to do the right thing.

‘God don’t like ugly’ is what my grandma used to say
https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2020/3/4/1924191/–God-don-t-like-ugly-is-what-my-grandma-used-to-say

One of the most valued attributes in the black community is empathy. One of our strongest motivators is survival. We see Donald Trump as a heinous enemy. That’s not paranoia. For us it is a fact of daily life. So we chose to vote for a man, a white man, who has exhibited empathy over decades, who went to Selma on Sunday, who showed up at Mother Emanuel, who attended Elijah Cummings’ funeral, and who had Obama’s back for eight years. We decided Biden has the best shot at assuring our survival.

The first article is locked behind a paywall. An easy lifehack to use to deal with these sorts of articles is that, for most web browsers, you can bypass the paywall if you hit the “esc” key before you start scrolling down.

The second article has a lot of good screencaps from Twitter, and it’s powerful. If you decide to read it, you might want to sit down first.

For me personally, there are two main things to take away from this conversation. The first is that many (but far from all, obviously) community leaders and organizers don’t actually spend that much time on social media. The second is that this country really needs to devote more effort to understanding communities that exist (for the most part) independently of the major coastal cities, and this is especially true of the American South.